The Death of Socialism

Front Cover
Author
Robert Corfe
List Price
£12.99, US$ 20.99, €18.60
ISBN
978-1-906791-16-2
Dewey Classification
306.3’45
BIC Categories
JPFF, JPFM, JFSC, JNA, JPV, JHBA, KCA
Pages
xvi/173
Preview
Google Books

About The Author

Robert Corfe is a prolific author who has written extensively on the benefits of social capitalism. He is a political scientist and businessman, with considerable experience of political life, and in this book he describes the necessity for a new political mindset in view of the bankruptcy of the old conflictual patterns of left/right politics. His analysis of the ills of the left’s collectivism and the inability of socialism to move forward constructively are drawn largely from his personal experiences in the Labour party. For many years he was a senior manager in manufacturing industry, and later a management consultant advising SMEs, usually in the engineering sector. He is also the author of three autobiographical books under different pseudonyms: Death in Riyadh dark secrets in hidden Arabia (Geoff Carter), based on his experiences as a businessman in the Middle East in the 1980s; My Conflict With A Soviet Spy the story of the Ron Evans spy case (Eddie Miller), based on his adventures in Scandinavia in the 1960s; and, The Girl From East Berlin (James Furner), an epic novel relating the story of his love affair in the old German capital at the end of the 1950s. In 1987 he founded the Campaign For Industry, to which he was elected Chairman, and for which he wrote many pamphlets on the problems of contemporary business. His broad experience, frequent travels overseas, and years of residence in Continental Europe have given him a unique perspective of socio-economic issues.

About The Book

Socialism and the mindset of the traditional left have outlived their purpose. A new political philosophy is needed in the cause of creating a fair and egalitarian society for the peoples of our planet. This is a startling yet profound book which strikes at the foundations of established politics in the West.

The author’s conclusions are drawn from two directions: an analysis of the consequences of the transformation of society over the past 60 years in industrialised economies; and personal experiences as an activist, both locally and nationally, after 14 years within the Labour party. It is demonstrated that both the Labour party, and socialism in the wider world, is now counter-productive to its given purpose: i.e. it hinders rather than promotes the progress of the less fortunate people in our midst.

The left is hampered by two great faults in its thinking and policy: its idolatrous commitment to collectivism, poisoning its good intentions; and its blind spot to the psychological need for the productive business instinct, described by the author as the missing “gene” of socialism. The author describes his attempts to modernise the Labour party and initiate free discussion, followed by the horrific experience of his public denunciation by an old stalwart “for writing without the authority of the party leadership.” This led to his resignation in 2008.

Modern men and women are dependent on the promotion of a healthy individualism for personal success – and certainly in maintaining a free society. It is shown how political ideas need to follow in the wake of social and technological progress, and not vice versa. When ideologies outgrow their purpose society regresses.

The future calls for a new progressive politics of universal humanity; a repudiation of class conflict which compounds rather than resolves substantive issues; the syncretising of political interests of relevance to all humanity; and a return to the Enlightenment values of a former age. This is a book with a refreshing insight in brushing away the political cobwebs of the past.